Student given 2% chance of survival after horror crash is ‘luckiest girl alive’

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A young women given just 2% chance of survival after a horror car crash says she is the “luckiest girl in the world” after defying the odds.

Student Macy Window, 20, is still unable to walk, move her arms and write six months after her Citroen C1 crashed into a tree near Faversham, Kent.

She was driving back home to Corringham, Essex, to celebrate her dad’s birthday when the car skidded off the rain-soaked M2 at 72mph on June 6.

Her boyfriend, who was due to meet her halfway, found her trapped in her car when he used a location tracking app, and it took six hours for the emergency services to free her as she begged: “Somebody help me, somebody help me, get me out of this car.”

Macy had punctured lungs and a severed main artery, was in a coma for six weeks and suffered strokes as doctors battled to save her life.

After she was finally freed, the University of Kent student was airlifted to King’s College Hospital in London, where she underwent hours of life-saving surgery to stop the bleeding.

Macy spent six weeks in an induced coma, missing her 20th birthday as her family gathered round her bedside with balloons and ac ake, but beat the grim odds given by doctors.

She is still receiving treatment and intensive rehabilitation six months on and doesn’t remember much about the smash.

Speaking from her hospital bed, Macy said: “I was meant to meet my boyfriend at the services, and apparently I gave him my location so he could see where I was.

“He noticed that my car hadn’t moved in 15 minutes and he knew that there was no traffic on the road, so he started to worry and tried to call me but there was no answer.

“No one was in the car with me. I wasn’t speeding, I was going 72 mph and I wasn’t on my phone.

“The police just deemed it as inexperience of driving in that weather.”

She added: “Everyone tells me that I’m the strongest person they know. Everyone tells me that I’m a miracle, a success story.

“But going through that and having that two per cent survival expectancy, I could only say that I’m the luckiest girl in the world.”

Doctors brought her out of the coma early after she suffered a series of strokes on her brain.

Within a few weeks she regained consciousness and was taken off a ventilator.

She was allowed a speaking valve on for 15 minutes a day, where she was able to take swabs of water and say one word at a time.

She said: “It was really upsetting not being able to talk to my family – when I first got out of my coma, I had no voice, so all I had to do was I had to stick my tongue out for yes and blink hard for no.

“When I was finally allowed to have a speaking valve in, my first word was my horse’s name.

Macy regained her speech after five weeks and within two months the speaking valve was removed, allowing her to talk freely and eat a normal diet.

She has had a nasal gastric tube reinserted for her body to get the proteins to fight the infections and help her body to heal.

But she still cannot walk, move her arms or write.

Macy said: “I had a few strokes on my brain, so basically I can’t move any of my arms or upper limbs and I can’t move my legs, I can’t feel my right leg.

“I am slowly, slowly, slowly, starting to be able to really engage with videos, because I am in so much pain, and I am on a constant infusion of ketamine and morphine to deal with my pain.

“It just takes time and seeing what I can actually get back and what I don’t get back, and if I can walk again, if I’m in a wheelchair and if I can use my arms again. It’s like a huge question mark.”

Her recovery has been taking place during the Covid-19 pandemic, meaning visitation hours for family and friends have been limited.

A JustGiving page has been set up to help Macy’s rehabilitation, so far raising more than £20,000.

A week at a rehabilitation centre is expected to cost almost £13,000 and a three month stay would be more than £150,000.

Macy saidher perspective on life and her thoughts on disability have “massively changed” since the crash.

She said: “I will never take anything for granted ever again.

“I will never get in a car with gel toenails ever again, because they do not come off.

“My whole perspective on disability [has changed], and my own identity, that I’m actually struggling with at the moment.

“The label of ‘disabled’ just feels so degrading. I’m dealing very much with that, with my psychologist.

“The thought of me being labelled disabled is really, really hard.

“I actually had to have a skin graft because my right leg was trapped in the car, so the skin from my left leg was skin grafted on my right leg.

“It is visible as well and I can’t even bring myself to look. It literally changed everything.”